Follow Unscatter

A weekly update of content from around the web including modern takes on the ancient world, material related to this past week’s articles, and a look at what our editorial staff is reading.

This week:

Sarah Scullin on acrostics, ancient and modern: Part 1 and Part 2

A history of campus harassment at University of Chicago.

A recipe for gingerbread cuneiform tablets.

Ancient Egyptian funerary portraits.

What to do when you find an artifact.

Are people in alt-ac careers happier than their tenure-track peers?

Saturnalia and the Roman New Year.

Plato, white supremacy, and totalitarianism.

Subway archaeology in Rome.

Remaking ancient art with pixels.

Seneca’s advice on buying gifts.

Classics and the American dream of a white city.

Mythological superheroes in Coldplay and the Chainsmokers.

Donna Zuckerberg: Emily Wilson continues her incredibly insightful and thought-provoking virtual book tour; Lifehacker on how to report sexual harassment; the single best Christmas card on the internet, brought to you by the wonderful Marginalia Paraphernalia Kickstarter.

Sarah Scullin: Shame on me as both a crafter and feminist for not considering how crafting ought to be intersectional; so long as powerful people can bury their enemies in lawsuits people will probably still overuse the term “allegedly,” despite these great arguments advanced against the use of the term; 29 viral GIFs and photos from 2017 that were totally fake … sad! I had occasion to visit Hyperbole and a Half for the first time in years: this is one of her best comics.

Yung In Chae: The problem with judging the quality of a story by its wokeness, the horrific accusations against T.J. Miller, skin care as a coping mechanism, and 7 gift ideas that are more feminist than a T-shirt that just has the word.

Tori Lee: The opioid crisis is spreading into black America; on why some people are spending the holidays alone; what kids around the world leave out for Santa (feat. rice porridge…poor Santa); why mental health is a poor measure of a president.

Eidolon.pub is an online journal devoted to engaging the personal, the political, and the classical. Pitch us essays a pitches@eidolon.pub. Send links via email, Facebook and Twitter (@Eidolon_Journal). Enjoy our links? Consider supporting us on our Patreon, and check out our store for new Eidolon merchandise!

A weekly update of content from around the web including modern takes on the ancient world, material related to this past week’s articles, and a look at what our editorial staff is reading.

This week:

Beware of experts with PhDs.

The top 10 archaeological discoveries of 2017.

Libraries and net neutrality.

Invite a Greek storyteller to holiday dinner.

Intestinal parasites in Ancient Greek burials.

Emily Wilson on women in the Odyssey.

Rome revokes Ovid’s exile!

How Ancient Rome is going high tech.

Donna Zuckerberg: Bon Appetit, of all places, has a deeply thoughtful essay about sexual harassment and the “not my story to tell ” trope; capitalization of letters is ending, and I couldn’t be happier; the disturbing tale of how Brigid Hughes’ editorship was erased from the history of the Paris Review; a troll tax.

Sarah Scullin: “The book that made me a feminist was written by an abuser”; this twitter thread about voter fraud in the AL senate election is pretty hilarious; Pepe the Frog emoticons are being purged from the internet; since 1700, wine glasses have gotten 7 times bigger; the faux-woke exploitation of marginalized writers; in case you were worried that you wouldn’t be able to find enough distractions from writing this winter, Longreads has begun publishing their “best of 2017” lists, including this one on investigative reporting; women share behaviors they’ve felt they had to change to avoid unwarranted attention from men; Rotten Apples is a searchable database that tells you if a movie or tv show is connected to anyone who’s been accused of sexual misconduct (fun fact: it’s all of them).

Yung In Chae: Robert from “Cat Person” asks for relationship advice on Reddit, the importance of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’s depiction of mental illness, Rebecca Solnit on redefining women’s work, what happened when one journalist tried to live like Donald Trump for a day (hint: it’s not pretty).

Tori Lee: This year’s annual hater’s guide to the Williams-Sonoma catalog is out; blue is the fastest color; an AI writes a chapter of Harry Potter and it’s uncanny; an ode to Danskos (high up on my holiday wishlist); the trendiest kind of wedding guest list.

Eidolon.pub is an online journal devoted to engaging the personal, the political, and the classical. Pitch us essays a pitches@eidolon.pub. Send links via email, Facebook and Twitter (@Eidolon_Journal). Enjoy our links? Consider supporting us on our Patreon, and check out our store for new Eidolon merchandise!

image

A weekly update of content from around the web including modern takes on the ancient world, material related to this past week’s articles, and a look at what our editorial staff is reading.

This week:

More college students saying #MeToo, more defamation suits.

And #MeTooPhD, academia’s complicity in harassment.

A pattern of harassment in Columbia Classics.

Gods in color.

Should academics be paid for peer review?

Rome’s Colosseum garden.

Mary Beard on women and power.

What Aristotle would say about the age of Trump.

ASOR initiative on the status of women.

Julius Caesar’s empty audience.

Donna Zuckerberg: Delightful alternatives to “bless you” after someone sneezes; has bad sex writing gotten less bad?; this fascinating profile of a forensic ornithologist aka “feather detective”; when bad men are given the power to define what makes art “good.”

Sarah Scullin: Kick against the pricks; this article on raising a teenage daughter (with comments and corrections by the author’s teenage daughter) is perfection; the color of my lipstick does not concern you; I can hear this silent GIF and that famous dress is blue and black; printable catcalling citations; Pantsuit Nation and the tale of the pumpkin spice allies; Laurie Penny on the consent of the (un)governed; 52 things some guy learned in 2017.

Yung In Chae: The lawsuit against Emma Cline has all the elements of a television show—sex, lies, and plagiarism, a blistering takedown of Ben Shapiro, how flirting in journalism hurts women reporters, Hamilton and the rewriting of America’s story, a young Joan Didion’s essay on self-respect, how the United States capitalized on the romances of Fulbright Scholars like Sylvia Plath, Harvey Weinstein’s complicity machine, Roxane Gay on the importance of truth, you can’t make a living on Patreon, but you should become an Eidolon patron anyway!

Tori Lee: Has Betsy DeVos actually helped the cosmetology industry? What to do if a guy arrives in the E.R. with a “Do Not Resuscitate” tattoo; Asian Americans experience prejudice too; end of semester bingo.

Eidolon.pub is an online journal devoted to engaging the personal, the political, and the classical. Pitch us essays a pitches@eidolon.pub. Send links via email, Facebook and Twitter (@Eidolon_Journal). Enjoy our links? Consider supporting us on our Patreon, and check out our store for new Eidolon merchandise!

“Strangle facists with the chains they would have you wear.”“Strangle facists with the chains they would have you wear.”It’s the third Friday of November. That means it’s NaNoWriMo time and I’m frantically writing every day.

Welcome to my Friday Five: Only the top five (IMHO) stories of the week and five videos (plus notable obituaries and a recap of my posts).

Stories of the Week:

THE 50 BEST SUPERHERO MOVIES OF ALL TIME.

95% of corporate earnings go to…

View On WordPress

“Strangle facists with the chains they would have you wear.”It’s the third Friday of November. That means it’s NaNoWriMo time and I’m frantically writing every day. Welcome to my Friday Five: Only the top five (IMHO) stories of the week and five videos (plus notable obituaries and a recap of my posts). Stories of the Week: THE 50 BEST SUPERHERO MOVIES OF ALL TIME. 95% of corporate earnings go to…

View On WordPress

Graphic depiction from Rachel ‪@maddow‬ that shows exactly what the Persisterhood did in Virginia (click to embiggen)

Graphic depiction from Rachel ‪@maddow‬ that shows exactly what the Persisterhood did in Virginia (click to embiggen)

It’s the second Friday of November. That means it’s NaNoWriMo time and I’m frantically writing every day.

As I explained a couple of weeks ago, my long-running weekly round up of all the links I thought worth sharing has been retired, replaced by this, my Friday Five. Only the top…

View On WordPress

Graphic depiction from Rachel ‪@maddow‬ that shows exactly what the Persisterhood did in Virginia (click to embiggen)It’s the second Friday of November. That means it’s NaNoWriMo time and I’m frantically writing every day. As I explained a couple of weeks ago, my long-running weekly round up of all the links I thought worth sharing has been retired, replaced by this, my Friday Five. Only the top…

View On WordPress

Friday Five (scientific serendipity)

It’s the first Friday of November. That means it’s NaNoWriMo time and I’m frantically writing every day.

As I mentioned last week, my long-running weekly round up of all the links I thought worth sharing has been retired, replaced by this, my Friday Five. Only the top five (IMHO) stories of the week and five videos and a recap of my posts.

Stories of the Week:

‘Scientific Serendipity’ Spurs…

View On WordPress

Friday Five (scientific serendipity)

It’s the first Friday of November. That means it’s NaNoWriMo time and I’m frantically writing every day. As I mentioned last week, my long-running weekly round up of all the links I thought worth sharing has been retired, replaced by this, my Friday Five. Only the top five (IMHO) stories of the week and five videos and a recap of my posts. Stories of the Week: ‘Scientific Serendipity’ Spurs…

View On WordPress

A weekly update of content from around the web including modern takes on the ancient world, material related to this past week’s articles, and a look at what our editorial staff is reading.

This week:

What the Greek myths teach us about anger in troubled times.

African Americans and the Classics: An Introduction.

#ClassicsSoWhite.

What to do when Nazis are obsessed with your field.

Donna Zuckerberg: Ursula K. Le Guin’s blog; how getting into Modern Love can change a writer’s life; Anne Helen Petersen’s career trajectory is amazing.

Sarah Scullin: Denis Phillips’ Facebook feed is the only source I’ve trusted for Irma updates; how to prep to evacuate for a hurricane; a list of hotels that allow pets; how long fish can survive without filtration.

Yung In Chae: Why the Economist doesn’t use bylines (in print), how Maggie Haberman gets shit done, why people in happy relationships cheat, Verrit is weird, but its founder Peter Daou is even weirder, I can’t decide which is more awesome: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ latest article or its art, a couple is actually named Harvey and Irma, and Laurie Penny on the age of anxiety.

Tori Lee: How zoos and aquariums handle hurricanes; excerpts from the all-girl remake of Lord of the Flies; what the hell people actually eat for dinner (I am definitely in the snack-dinner camp).

Eidolon.pub is an online journal devoted to engaging the personal, the political, and the classical. Pitch us essays a pitches@eidolon.pub. Send links via email, Facebook and Twitter (@Eidolon_Journal). We look forward to hearing from you!

A weekly update of content from around the web including modern takes on the ancient world, material related to this past week’s articles, and a look at what our editorial staff is reading.

This week:

A reality show about bros living as Romans.

Honest Latin mottos for your overrated university.

How exercise might help in language acquisition.

What we wear in the underfunded university.

The frustrations of attending academic conferences when you’re unaffiliated.

Donna Zuckerberg: This instagram bro poet (broet?) is my new fave; Matt Furie finally managed to successfully sue an Alt-Right guy who used Pepe the Frog; a guide to writing insufferable emails.

Sarah Scullin: Anger that can save the world: on justice, feminism, and the Furies; why each Meyers-Briggs personality type was fired; Terry Pratchett’s unfinished works got a new look; some TV dorks really care a lot about your TV settings; female dragonflies have the right idea.

Yung In Chae: Rebecca Solnit wonders what her life would be like if she were a man, Shaun King’s mind-blowing exposé of an NYPD conspiracy, Naomi Klein links Hurricane Harvey and climate change, reading Jane Eyre while black, women who simply take up space.

Tori Lee: A student’s perspective on being black in the Ivy League; who’s allowed to hold hands; the myth of “male” and “female” brains; how to keep your ego in check, feat. motion-activated sinks; King’s Cross Station this morning gave me all the feels.

Eidolon.pub is an online journal devoted to engaging the personal, the political, and the classical. Pitch us essays a pitches@eidolon.pub. Send links via email, Facebook and Twitter (@Eidolon_Journal). We look forward to hearing from you!

Friday Saturday Links (appalling statistics edition)

9% of the respondents to an ABC News poll say that it's acceptable for someone to hold White Sutpremacist/neo-Nazi views.

9% of the respondents to an ABC News poll say that it’s acceptable for someone to hold White Sutpremacist/neo-Nazi views.

I’m running so late on Friday Links that here I am posting them on Saturday.

Besides being another busy week for me at work plus a small medical thing and a vacation day that I really, really needed, there were just so many things I bookmarked. This week was just insane, news…

View On WordPress

Friday Saturday Links (appalling statistics edition)

9% of the respondents to an ABC News poll say that it’s acceptable for someone to hold White Sutpremacist/neo-Nazi views.I’m running so late on Friday Links that here I am posting them on Saturday. Besides being another busy week for me at work plus a small medical thing and a vacation day that I really, really needed, there were just so many things I bookmarked. This week was just insane, news…

View On WordPress

A weekly update of content from around the web including modern takes on the ancient world, material related to this past week’s articles, and a look at what our editorial staff is reading.

This week:

Roman Britain, cartoons, and caricatures.

Blood and soil from antiquity to Charlottesville.

How coloring books can teach us about diversity in antiquity.

The Alt-Right is misreading Nietzsche.

A Babylonian tablet containing trigonometry.

Donna Zuckerberg: Literally my worst editing nightmare; the YA novel world is rocked by a bizarre scandal involving early 00’s-celebrities; Daenerys’ winter coat was the real star of last week’s episode of GoT; a “bad feminism” reading list for those making sense of this Joss Whedon nonsense

Sarah Scullin: If this Teen Vogue piece about how women have always been a part of white supremacy activates your defense mechanisms, may I gently suggest you just sit with that feeling for a bit? mutatis mutandis: unlearning the myth of American innocence; this one-off zine about the problematic aspects of Joss Whedon, entitled “We Told You,” is currently accepting submissions; I’m currently trying to hold myself back from re-decorating each room of my house according to these cinema palettes.

Yung In Chae: Mic’s recent layoffs reveal that its commitment to social justice was always skin-deep, Kim Wall’s death and how female journalists depend on their subjects’ decency, the future of the personal essay.

Tori Lee: A sisterhood of expecting mothers in Alaska is trying to lower the maternal death rate; as a woman who wore a school uniform for seven years, I appreciated this piece on how to keep your skirt down when it’s windy; the case for long novels by women; “Hi, I’m Jim. I bet you’ve had a really interesting eyebrow journey,” & other pick up lines that would actually work.

Eidolon.pub is an online journal devoted to engaging the personal, the political, and the classical. Pitch us essays at pitches@eidolon.pub. Send links via email, Facebook and Twitter (@Eidolon_Journal). We look forward to hearing from you!

Friday Links (take a stand edition)

“I want my friends to understand that 'staying out of politics' or being 'sic of politics' is privilege in action. Your privilege allows you to live a non-political existence... if you find politics annoying and you just want everyone to be nice, pliease know that peopled are literally fighting for their lives and safety. You might not see it, but that's what privilege does.” —Kristen Tea, motherwiselige.org

“I want my friends to understand that ‘staying out of politics’ or being ‘sic of politics’ is privilege in action. Your privilege allows you to live a non-political existence… if you find politics annoying and you just want everyone to be nice, pliease know that peopled are literally fighting for their lives and safety. You might not see it, but that’s what privilege does.” —Kristen Tea,…

View On WordPress

Friday Links (take a stand edition)

“I want my friends to understand that ‘staying out of politics’ or being ‘sic of politics’ is privilege in action. Your privilege allows you to live a non-political existence… if you find politics annoying and you just want everyone to be nice, pliease know that peopled are literally fighting for their lives and safety. You might not see it, but that’s what privilege does.” —Kristen Tea,…

View On WordPress

A collection of links, articles, and other ephemera I stumbled upon this week but never posted anywhere. For more links, I keep a running list of everything I read on reading.am.

To Listen:

  • Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is making the podcast rounds in support of his new book and appeared on two of my favorite podcasts this week: WTF and Larry Wilmore’s Black on the Air. It’s easy to dismiss Kareem as just a former basketball player but he’s become a talented writer and cultural/media critic. I enjoyed both of these conversations immensely covering everything from James Baldwin and race relations to writing processes and why he likes HBO’s Girls.
  • Exchanged is a new design podcast from two design students, Erin Pierce and Linda Schultheis, and they asked me to be their first guest! This was a really fun conversation where I talked — probably a bit too much — about my own podcast, design and writing, criticism, and why I find design an endlessly fascinating discipline. Give it a listen and support their new show!

Two of my friends announced they are writing books!

  • Kyle Chayka, who I’ve worked on a few projects with over the last few months, will be publishing The Longing For Less, a cultural look at minimalism. Cannot wait for this.
  • My San Francisco friend, Marcin Wichary, formerly a designer at Medium, has been working on a book about the history of keyboards. He’s been posting some of his research on Medium and if anyone can do this book, it’s Marcin. Every time we hung out, I left inspired and energized — a great person and a great brain.

Julian Assange: Man Without a Country
I completely devoured this lengthy profile of the Wikileaks founder in this week’s New Yorker. It’s a fascinating look inside his life in the Ecuadorian embassy, his own process of releasing/publishing information, and the role he played in the 2016 election. A great profile and worth reading.

Prince gets his own Pantone Color
The late, great artist Prince is getting his own Pantone purple: “The (naturally) purple hue, represented by his “Love Symbol #2” was inspired by his custom-made Yamaha purple piano, which was originally scheduled to go on tour with the performer before his untimely passing at the age of 57. The color pays tribute to Prince’s indelible mark on music, art, fashion and culture.”

Victory in the Shadows
Teju Cole’s latest for The New York Times: “The spaciousness and blur of Mofokeng’s pictures come ultimately from intimacy with this ‘‘gossamer’’ world. It is a world that isn’t insubstantial but that is elusive to the uninitiated or to outsiders. His photographs have used a variety of techniques to adumbrate this world. The pictures drift away from the picturesque and come closer to life itself, to seriti, and the subtle range of associations embedded in that word. These are photographs of quiet disorder and imprecision, shadow-work and strategic refusal, evocations of what can neither be hurried along nor extinguished.”

Andy Baio joins Fuzzco
Big get for the Portland design studio: internet giant Andy Baio is joining the studio as Director of Technology: “This is my first time doing client work, but Fuzzco is very prolific and I’m afforded the opportunity to incorporate whatever stack I like with each new build. For someone hoping to play with a wide variety of tools, it’s sort of perfect.It’s also my first time working in an office environment in a decade, and I kind of love it. It’s a great team of artists and designers, and they’re pushing me to be better in every way.”

Jim Carrey: I Needed Color
I really enjoyed this shorty documentary on how Jim Carrey left acting to pursue his other interest in painting — it’s a nice, touching piece and great to see someone at the top of their game, leave it for another passion.

Friday Links (death defying edition)

“A gay christian is not an oxymoron. A hateful christian most certainly is.” - “When you get quoted on a church sign.” — John Pavlovitz

“A gay christian is not an oxymoron. A hateful christian most certainly is.” – “When you get quoted on a church sign.” — John Pavlovitz (click to embiggen)

It’s the second Friday in August, and we’re surviving a tamped down heat wave and smokezilla. Those are related. While the unhealthy air quality is not good for us, on the other had, it’s blocking enough sunlight that (depending on which part…

View On WordPress

Friday Links (death defying edition)

“A gay christian is not an oxymoron. A hateful christian most certainly is.” – “When you get quoted on a church sign.” — John Pavlovitz (click to embiggen)It’s the second Friday in August, and we’re surviving a tamped down heat wave and smokezilla. Those are related. While the unhealthy air quality is not good for us, on the other had, it’s blocking enough sunlight that (depending on which part…

View On WordPress

A collection of links, articles, and other ephemera I stumbled upon this week but never posted anywhere. For more links, I keep a running list of everything I read on reading.am.

Things to Listen to:

  • I’ve previously posted about Jesse Thorn’s limited-run podcast The Turnaround, but it’s worth relinking as he wraps up the series today. The entire run was a great look at the art of interviewing — from great people like Errol Morris, Terry Gross, Werner Herzog, and Larry King — and I found I learned so much that I’ve already put in place in my own limited experience interviewing.
  • Ways of Hearing: Radiotopia, the podcast network behind shows like 99% Invisible and Song Exploder, has launched a new experimental podcast, Showcase, where they will distribute limited run and experimental short-form series (think anthology style — each season is a different type of podcast with different hosts, producers, etc.). The first series is called Ways of Hearing and is a look at the evolution of audio and recording technology. I listened to the first episode and loved it. (Semi-related: Sarah Larson, of The New Yorker, is starting a new podcast criticism column for the magazine — her first piece is on Ways of Hearing.)

Why I’m Not a Tech Utopian
The New Republic has an excellent excerpt from Ellen Ullman’s new book, Life in Code. If you’ve not read Ullman’s previous memoir, Close to the Machine, it’s a must read — one of my favorites. I can’t wait to read this new one.

How America Lost Its Mind
Speaking of new books, Kurt Andersen (of Spy, Studio 360, and various novels) has a new book out this fall called Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire and The Atlantic has an excerpt as this week’s cover story. I listened to an interview with Andersen from years ago and he was talking about working on this book and it’s only gotten more timely since — another one I’m looking forward to!

When Silicon Valley took over journalism
Related to the previous two links, Franklin Foer writes in The Atlantic about his experience at The New Republic after Chris Hughes bought it and nearly killed it. (Previous links about TNR’s shakeup here and here.)

How Rebecca Solnit Became the Voice of the Resistance
Alice Gregory profiles the author Rebecca Solnit for The New York Times T Magazine. Solnit is a favorite of mine (and has come up on multiple episodes of my podcast) and I love that she’s getting the attention she deserves. New to Solnit? May I recommend starting with Hope in the Dark or, my favorite, River of Shadows.

On keeping drafts in the digital age
Sarah Manguso in The New York Times on whether writers should keep drafts of their work now that it’s all digital. It’s a fascinating topic I’ve admittedly not thought about much — I don’t keep every draft of things I’m working on but do tend to keep the big revisions.