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A weekly update of content from around the web including modern takes on the ancient world, material related to this past week’s articles, and a look at what our editorial staff is reading.

This week:

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How A.E. Housman invented Englishness.

Why the White House is reading Greek history.

1600 Pylos and Sphacteria Avenue.

How to avoid a post-scholar America.

Hedge funds with the names of Greek gods.

Donna Zuckerberg: I identify with this writer’s struggle to title his book about puns; Roxane Gay’s brilliance and willingness to open a vein onto the page are awe-inspiring; 75 Ken dolls, ranked by lesbianism.

Sarah Scullin: The subculture of competitive punning; the dangers of reading in bed; a massively multiplayer online … jigsaw puzzle?

Yung In Chae: Zadie Smith on Get Out and the Emmett Till painting, Mark Payne used to do acid with Timothy Morton, @SoSadToday on being (openly) married to an illness.

Tori Lee: The Onion truly understands my relationship with household pests; optimizing the amount of underwear you should pack for vacation; I am guilty of this myself, but really: you should do yoga.

Eidolon.pub is an online journal devoted to engaging the personal, the political, and the classical. Pitch us essays a eidolon@paideia-institute.org. Send links via email, Facebook and Twitter (@Eidolon_Journal). We look forward to hearing from you!

A weekly update of content from around the web including modern takes on the ancient world, material related to this past week’s articles, and a look at what our editorial staff is reading. 

This week:

A classicist received death threats from the alt-right over an art history essay.

Relatedly, excellent advice for helping scholars who are being threatened online.

A brand representation proposal for Medusa.

How to write and speak beyond academia.

Did Bob Dylan take his Nobel lecture from Sparknotes?

Narcissus and symbolic classical debt.

Roman authors as professors.

Trump and the true meaning of ‘idiot.’

How the Romans can help us study.

Amazons and Wonder Woman.

Donna Zuckerberg: Bitch Media is calling out Bustle’s corporate feminism; takes on the Caesar in the Park controversy; a stunning photo series on the anniversary of the Pulse massacre; simple acts to help stop climate change; the D.I.Y. slime trend; how to become internet-famous by getting the top response on Trump’s tweets (if you can’t get internet-famous by making videos of yourself making slime, I guess).

Sarah Scullin: I’m sorry I was so crazy while you were treating me like shit; persuasive proof that America is full of racist and selfish people; why calls for empathy from the left are misguided; white people will always let you down; science shows that women are stronger than men; this writing advice for high school students that would also have been good sex advice for my high school boyfriends could also double as ways to “edit your lover”.

Yung In Chae: The disturbing parallel between the Comey hearing and sexual assault cases, Naomi Klein on the danger of underestimating Trump, mistaken identity and Legends of the Fall, and the politics of the Grenfell Tower fire.

Tori Lee: Linguists say we can use exclamation points now! Also, the lack of online dating in rom-coms! Environmental experiences have racial roots! And how the white establishment waged a war on Chinese restaurants in the U.S.!

Eidolon.pub is an online journal devoted to engaging the personal, the political, and the classical. Pitch us essays a eidolon@paideia-institute.org. Send links via email, Facebook and Twitter (@Eidolon_Journal). We look forward to hearing from you! 

Friday Links (all the colors edition)

Let’s stop talking about inclusion and just do it…

It’s Friday. The third Friday in Pride Month. And both my husband and I came down sick this week, but I still have impossible deadlines at work, so you’ll notice a lot fewer links this week.

Anyway, here are the links I found interesting this week, sorted into categories.

Links of the Week

The Surprising Controversy Surrounding A More Inclusive…

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Friday Links (all the colors edition)

Let’s stop talking about inclusion and just do it…It’s Friday. The third Friday in Pride Month. And both my husband and I came down sick this week, but I still have impossible deadlines at work, so you’ll notice a lot fewer links this week. Anyway, here are the links I found interesting this week, sorted into categories. Links of the Week The Surprising Controversy Surrounding A More Inclusive…

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Start off your weekend with fun #fridayreads on the #blog! #yvr

A Friday Roundup packed with updates & interesting reads from around the web. Buried ships of San Francisco, DIY leather wall hanging & more!

A Friday Roundup packed with updates & interesting reads from around the web. Buried ships of San Francisco, DIY leather wall hanging & more!
Ummmm how did we get to another Friday so quickly? I literally feel as if I am having deja-vu with writing up today’s Friday Roundup. I feel as if I just did it yesterday…

A Friday Roundup packed with updates & interesting reads from around the web. Buried ships of San Francisco, DIY leather wall hanging & more!

Tacos and Coconut Mint Margarita at Tacofino!

It’s been one of thoseweeks. The one where I got a new pillow and it took me allllll week to break it in. So tonight I expect to have a full night’s sleep finally after five days.…

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A collection of links, articles, and other ephemera I stumbled upon this week but never posted anywhere. For more links, I keep a running list of everything I read on reading.am.

Hasan Minhaj’s new one-man show/stand up special Homecoming King hit Netflix a few weeks ago and it’s really, really good. Doreen St. Felix has a great review of it in The New Yorker. (I’m finding myself drawn to this standup style that’s more like one-man show with over-arching narratives and complex choreography and performance. Mike Birbiglia was the first show I saw like this, but other recents like Chris Gethard’s Career Suicide and Neal Brennan’s 3 Mics are great additions to the genre.)

I enjoyed this short profile on Hiro Murai, the director of my favorite show of last year, Atlanta, and one of my favorite episodes of Legion. It’s nice to hear his transition of music videos to narrative and the influence of David Lynch and Japanese cinema to his own aesthetic.

The New Yorker’s email newsletter pointed me towards this 1997 essay from Adam Gopnik on Fredrick Law Olmsted’s transition from journalist to landscape designer. Olmsted is most famous for designing Central Park, but I had no idea he worked as a writer for years before moving into design.

Wesley Morris, who continually writes some of my favorite commentary, on Bill Maher’s big mistake: “Nobody asked me to write about Ms. Griffin — perhaps only because a lot of Americans are clinging to the idea that we need a sense of moral dignity, that it’s all we have. No matter what some people might wish for the president, we can’t wish that. Not on Instagram, not anywhere. We just can’t. We understand the harm of Ms. Griffin’s transgression. But we’re not sure what to do with affronts to race like Mr. Maher’s.”

Here’s a nice chat with Robert Caro as he nears the end of his epic LBJ biography: “I don’t want anybody to write a book with my name on it but me, I’ve written an awful lot on power and as I say, I’m not rushing this last book. I’m trying to do it the same way as my other books. And I don’t want people to think that something is written by me when it’s not.” Caro’s The Power Broker is probably my all-time favorite book and the first LBJ volume is on our shelf — hoping to finally start it later this year.

The University of Reading is staging an exhibition on the work and influence of Emigre magazine. Would love to see this show!

In continuing the slow end of an era, Mickey Drexler has stepped down as CEO of J. Crew after fourteen years. This follows the resignation of the company’s creative director Jenna Lyons earlier this year. Drexler will be replaced with West Elm president James Brett.

James Poniewozik is the The New York Times television critic but I love his writing on politics — or perhaps more specifically, the spectacle of politics. Here’s his reality television analysis of yesterday’s Comey hearings.

Friday Links (Wonder Woman’s the hero we need edition)

“Clark, my country is all women. To us, it's not 'gay marriage,' it's just marriage.”

“Clark, my country is all women. To us, it’s not ‘gay marriage,’ it’s just marriage.”

It’s Friday. The second Friday in Pride Month. And the news in the real world continues to be both depressing and frightening. So, if you haven’t yet, I highly recommend you go see Wonder Woman, because no matter who you are, it should make you feel empowered (well, unless you’re an alt-right/neo-nazi/MRA jerk…

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Friday Links (Wonder Woman’s the hero we need edition)

“Clark, my country is all women. To us, it’s not ‘gay marriage,’ it’s just marriage.”It’s Friday. The second Friday in Pride Month. And the news in the real world continues to be both depressing and frightening. So, if you haven’t yet, I highly recommend you go see Wonder Woman, because no matter who you are, it should make you feel empowered (well, unless you’re an alt-right/neo-nazi/MRA jerk…

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A weekly update of content from around the web including modern takes on the ancient world, material related to this past week’s articles, and a look at what our editorial staff is reading.

This week:

Challenges for scholars who write for a wide audience.

Why the Islamic State blows up ancient artifacts.

U.S. students revive Ancient Greek and Latin.

The ancient origins of feminist craftivism.

Pass the dormice.

Why we need to start seeing the Classical World in color.

Worshiping the gun: the evolution of Vulcan.

Racism, multilingualism, and medieval studies.

Funding needs in Classical bioarchaeology.

Want to learn more about Greek myth? Take an online course with our Editor-in-Chief through Stanford Continuing Studies!

Donna Zuckerberg: Weddings of the .01%; Achilles is the perfect over-emotional heroKeeanga-Yahmatta Taylor is a goddamned hero for laying bare the radicalized mechanics of free speech in the US

Sarah Scullin: There is a free speech crisis, after all; Uber’s CEO is just a peach; a defense of call-out culture; the tale of a progressive professor who forgot to hide her racism; Comey or Ishiguro?

Yung In Chae: Yes, Daniel Mendelsohn is that much cooler than you, the 101 most influential tweets in Twitter history, Laurie Penny on the shocking comeback of the Labour Party, guilt and mourning.

Tori Lee: Seinfeld episodes from the point of view of the girlfriends; apparently millennials are killing casual dining; how interracial love is saving America; an Instagram account dedicated to women on TV applying lotion before bed.

Eidolon.pub is an online journal devoted to engaging the personal, the political, and the classical. Pitch us essays a eidolon@paideia-institute.org. Send links via email, Facebook and Twitter (@Eidolon_Journal). We look forward to hearing from you!

Friday Links (crayons of all kinds editions)

“We are all a little broken. But last time I checked, broken crayons still color the same.”

“We are all a little broken. But last time I checked, broken crayons still color the same.”

We had an extremely productive holiday weekend, getting a lot of errands and unpacking done. There’s still a lot to do. I hoped to continue the work weeknights this week, but we had another impossible deadline at work this week, which meant I worked really long hours Tuesday, Wednesday, and a bit of…

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Friday Links (crayons of all kinds editions)

“We are all a little broken. But last time I checked, broken crayons still color the same.”We had an extremely productive holiday weekend, getting a lot of errands and unpacking done. There’s still a lot to do. I hoped to continue the work weeknights this week, but we had another impossible deadline at work this week, which meant I worked really long hours Tuesday, Wednesday, and a bit of…

View On WordPress

A collection of links, articles, and other ephemera I stumbled upon this week but never posted anywhere. For more links, I keep a running list of everything I read on reading.am.

Hilton Als has a great piece in The New York Review of Books on Diane Arbus: “While Arbus’s genius found its fullest expression in photography, she was also an astute reader and writer whose letters, journals, and other writings deserve space on any serious reader’s shelf. She began keeping extensive notebooks at the time she started taking pictures in earnest, in 1956, and much of her available writing is collected in Diane Arbus: A Chronology (a treasure trove of a book whose design is vexing: the type is too small).”

Hannah Ellis, whose monograph piece I linked to earlier this week, has another essay in Creative Review on the politics of design, especially around progressive causes and capitalism: “Is the left-leaning designer who creates brand identities more of an oxymoron than the right-leaning commercial designer? Can you help maintain and stimulate a right-wing ideology, and then say with credibility that you’re of the left?”

The Barbican joins the growing list of museums to start technology and innovation incubators, with the launch of alt.barbican. The inaugural cohort features artists and designers working in artificial intelligence, surveillance, wearables, and robotics.

This was a fun read: Designer’s and Books has a nice feature on Philip Meggs, the great design historian and author of the classic Meggs History of Graphic Design, that includes a look inside his library at the books that influenced his own work. (The Meggs book was the text book for my own undergraduate design history class and I have fond memories up late studying with it.)

Nina Stossinger, a designer at Frere-Jones Type Foundry, reviews YouTube Sans, the new video company’s new proprietary typeface. “To be honest, the fonts strike me as subpar executions of a shallow concept. That would make them neither the first nor the worst of their kind. But as a type designer fascinated by how powerful good type can be, I find it frustrating to see a level of quality that should easily be surpassed by such a high-profile client and the firms that worked on the project.”

Everyone was linking to Rebecca Solnit’s piece on “The Loneliness of Donald Trump” this week, and with good reason. It’s an excellent assessment of our current political state: “A man who wished to become the most powerful man in the world, and by happenstance and intervention and a series of disasters was granted his wish. Surely he must have imagined that more power meant more flattery, a grander image, a greater hall of mirrors reflecting back his magnificence. But he misunderstood power and prominence. This man had bullied friends and acquaintances, wives and servants, and he bullied facts and truths, insistent that he was more than they were, than it is, that it too must yield to his will. It did not, but the people he bullied pretended that it did. Or perhaps it was that he was a salesman, throwing out one pitch after another, abandoning each one as soon as it left his mouth. A hungry ghost always wants the next thing, not the last thing.”

Speaking of Trump, Danny Hakim in The New York Times reports on Trump borrowing another family’s coat of arms, replacing the word “Integrity” with — you guessed it — “Trump”.

This is interesting: Bill Simmons’s site, The Ringer, is moving off Medium will now be hosted by Vox. The site will remain editorially independent and fully-owned by Simmons. The deal appears to be centered on technology and ad revenue. Launching on Medium was an interesting experiment but appears to have it’s limits. It will be curious to see if Vox opens it’s technology to more publications in this capacity, acting as a hosting platform in addition to a publishing company.

Christopher Knight on the radical changes planned for LACMA: “The plan’s most intriguing feature is how it upends our established idea of an art museum as a place to discover history. Paintings, sculptures, photographs and other works of art are most often seen as documents of the past. A proudly prancing horse in brightly glazed ceramic from a Chinese burial tomb shows us a Tang Dynasty world view, while values in 17th century West Africa are illuminated by a finely wrought bronze plaque of a Benin tribal official.”

A collection of links, articles, and other ephemera I stumbled upon this week but never posted anywhere. For more links, I keep a running list of everything I read on reading.am.

Daniel Mendelsohn’s essay on The Odyssey, his father, and a pilgrimage was my favorite thing I read this week. It’s an excerpt from his upcoming memoir that I’m definitely looking forward to now.

A nice profile of Mark Bradford and representing the United States in this year’s Venice Biennale: “Sitting on a crate, his long legs extended, Mr. Bradford, 55, was confronting a pressing concern beyond exhibition plans: How can he represent the United States abroad at a time when — as a black, gay man and a self-proclaimed “liberal and progressive thinker” — he no longer feels represented by his own government.”

Smart piece from Farhad Manjoo on how Instagram becoming Facebook’s new Facebook: “Instagram has thus triggered an echo — it feels like Facebook. More precisely, it feels the way Facebook did from 2009 to 2012, when it silently crossed over from one of those tech things that some people sometimes did to one of those tech things that everyone you know does every day.”

There is a Walter Benjamin exhibition currently on view at The Jewish Museum in New York that I’m hoping to catch when I’m up in the city next week. Claire Barliant has a mixed-review of the show in Bomb Magazine. (The exhibition and accompanying publication was designed Project Projects.)

Speaking of Project Projects, it’s co-founder Prem Krishnamuthpy, was interviewed in ArtNews with Chris Sharp about experimental galleries, exhibition making, and the future of exhibiting art. It’s a great read, and Prem is clearly thinking about this stuff in interesting ways. I saw him speak two weeks ago in Baltimore and he touched on some of his curatorial work and how it intersects with his design work.

NiemanStoryboard looks at the rise of serialized podcasts and the construction of binge-worthy narratives, in everything from S-Town and Serial, to Missing Richard Simmons and Making Oprah, the latter of which was structurally inspire by, of all things, House of Cards.

I’m really enjoying the final season of The Leftovers so I loved this interview with Damon Lindelof on this week’s episode of The Watch. This show has done an incredible job of reinventing itself and figuring out its voice after the mixed-reception of the first season. (I’ve been thinking about how The Leftovers and Halt and Catch Fire both were able to recalibrate themselves after underwhelming first seasons to create some of two of the most interesting shows on television right now. It’s impressive.)

Currently Listening: Grey - Kweku Collins
Currently Reading: 100 Years of Solitude - Gabriel García Márquez
Currently Watching: The Night Manager

Friday Links (100 days of scandal and lies edition)

It’s Friday!

We’re still packing and moving and packing and packing and… I finally had a responce to me ad giving away two four-drawer steel filing cabinets… and a few hours later the guy who responded said “never mind.” I really don’t want to have to pay someone to haul these away…

Anyway, here are the links I found interesting this week, sorted into categories.

Links of the Week

Tiny Jyn Erso…

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Friday Links (100 days of scandal and lies edition)

It’s Friday! We’re still packing and moving and packing and packing and… I finally had a responce to me ad giving away two four-drawer steel filing cabinets… and a few hours later the guy who responded said “never mind.” I really don’t want to have to pay someone to haul these away… Anyway, here are the links I found interesting this week, sorted into categories. Links of the Week Tiny Jyn Erso…

View On WordPress

A collection of links, articles, and other ephemera I stumbled upon this week but never posted anywhere. For more links, I keep a running list of everything I read on reading.am.

Doreen St. Felix wrote a cover story profile of Kara Walker for Vulture and it’s great. It covers the Domino Sugar Factory, race, identity and celebrity, and her early work.

After a four year “retirement” (if, by retirement, you mean directing 20 episodes of television and producing multiple other shows), Steven Soderbergh is returning to movies with Logan Lucky. Entertainment Weekly has an interview with the director on the new film and his interesting distribution model.

Musicians are now hiring “creative directors” to help manage their multi-platform brands. (I’ve previously posted about Virgil Abloh, Kanye West’s creative director, here.)

Sasha Frere-Jones has an excellent profile of the late Arthur Russell for The Village Voice. I love the variety in Russell’s work and this piece is a great introduction to his storied and all-too-short career.

My friend Kyle Chayka reviews a new book of drone photography for The New Republic — with lots of examples of drones in artistic practices.

Kevin Powell on Dave Chappelle in The New York Times T Magazine: “That Chappelle is an African-American raised by college professor parents, a Muslim with a Filipino wife, three biracial children and a white stepbrother, speaks to his singular ability to remix cultural boundaries in ways many cannot, or wish they could. He also happens to feel most comfortable in Middle America, on the acres of land he bought in Yellow Springs, Ohio, in the 2000s. So, yes, he is sprawling urban graffiti, with his casual usage of the N-word, his elastic black English and his fusillade of curse words, but he’s also small-town folk with a hard-won vulnerability.” I watched his two new Netflix specials recently and highly recommend them.

I can’t seem to read enough about the troubles at The Met and the recent ousting of director Thomas Campbell. Here’s a great inside look on what went wrong — both with Campbell and the institution in general — in Vulture. I’m really rooting for them and hope they can find their footing again.

Molly Worthen has a smart piece on the Evangelical Roots of post-truth and fake news: “Conservative evangelicals are not the only ones who think that an authority trusted by the other side is probably lying. But they believe that their own authority — the inerrant Bible — is both supernatural and scientifically sound, and this conviction gives that natural human aversion to unwelcome facts a special power on the right. This religious tradition of fact denial long predates the rise of the culture wars, social media or President Trump, but it has provoked deep conflict among evangelicals themselves.”

Steve Martin is teaching a MasterClass on stand-up comedy. From his interview in The New York Times: “I definitely tried to make it about creativity and also about life. All my thoughts about comedy are metaphorical, applying to anything else.” Also, Martin’s book, Born Standing Up, is a must-read. So, so good.

Natasha Tiku’s look at the rebranding of Mark Zuckerberg for BuzzFeed is excellent and one of the best things I read this week.

Sharp Type has released a new blackletter typeface called Respira. I’m a sucker for a good blackletter and this one feels fresh and fun. Plus, all proceeds go to the National Resources Defense Council to help fight climate change.

A weekly update of content from around the web including modern takes on the ancient world, material related to this past week’s articles, and a look at what our editorial staff is reading.

This week:

A father and son retrace Homer’s Odyssey.

Polybius and British communism.

Black men speaking Latin.

Endangered data in Ancient Rome.

A gallery of Roman noses.

The gentle guide to applying to grad school.

Donna Zuckerberg: Ijeoma Oluo was on fire this week with her brilliant profile of Rachel Dolezal and follow-up social pieces on black women in publishing and the difference between race and gender; Trump’s Elements of Style; stop apologizing for delayed email responses

Sarah Scullin: Woke 100 women; do college students live in the real world?; the sad reason why moms take selfies; illustrations of weird character descriptions from HP2; how to get a regency beach body; things full of beans that shouldn’t be full of beans (shudder)

Yung In Chae: The unemployed life of a professional writer, men who recommend David Foster Wallace, how late-night comedy fueled the rise of Donald Trump.

Tori Lee: Two great profiles: one from the Times on a Halal food vendor, and one by Doreen St. Felix on post-sugar-sphinx Kara Walker. And two comics: feminist baby, and this one I like to think of as the modern reception of Horace’s city mouse/country mouse satire.

Eidolon.pub is an online journal devoted to engaging the personal, the political, and the classical. Pitch us essays a eidolon@paideia-institute.org. Send links via email, Facebook and Twitter (@Eidolon_Journal). We look forward to hearing from you!

Friday Links (we’re in the middle of the move edition)

It’s Friday!

I haven’t been posting much this week because we’ve been packing. My work week has consisted of going to work, coming home, loading the car up with as many packed boxes as will fit, driving to the new place (a 25-35 minute drive depending on traffic), carrying all the boxes in the car up a flight of stairs to the new apartment, then driving back home to pack some more until bed…

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Friday Links (we’re in the middle of the move edition)

It’s Friday! I haven’t been posting much this week because we’ve been packing. My work week has consisted of going to work, coming home, loading the car up with as many packed boxes as will fit, driving to the new place (a 25-35 minute drive depending on traffic), carrying all the boxes in the car up a flight of stairs to the new apartment, then driving back home to pack some more until bed time.…

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A collection of links, articles, and other ephemera I stumbled upon this week but never posted anywhere. For more links, I keep a running list of everything I read on reading.am.

A great profile of Mike Judge, of Office Space, Idiocracy, and Silicon Valley, from this weekend’s New York Times Magazine: “If “Idiocracy” imagined that America would one day amuse itself into ruin, then “Silicon Valley” offers a compelling case for how we’ll go about doing it — not in spite of our best and brightest, but because of them.”

This week saw multiple profiles of Stephen Colbert, in celebration of his newfound status as the most-watched late-night host. Here’s The Hollywood Reporter cover story which has a nice interview with him, here’s The New York Times on how he finally found his groove on the new stage, and here’s Emily Nussbaum in The New Yorker on wanting more from him (and all late night comics).

This story on the Japanese clothing retailer, Uniqlo’s struggles to break in to the mainstream American market in Racked is so great. I wear a white Uniqlo oxford shirt everyday and hope they find some sticking power.

The latest Teju Cole essay for his On Photography column in The New York Times is on mourning and seeing and creating in the aftermath of tragedy: “ I wonder which events we in America are doomed to undergo in our own turn, events we may already be well in the middle of, whether by an act of war or by an act of God, whether with a nuclear element or not, events that will expose our utter unreadiness, alter our experience of the world permanently and require us to find new ways of seeing, and new ways of mourning.”

Vanessa Friedman on Jeff Koons’s strange new line of bags for Louis Vuitton: “Now, on the verge of the unveiling, Mr. Koons was sparkling of eye, beatific of mien and bountiful of reference. ‘Working on this, I felt a sense of my own potential, and the sharing of that with a large community,’ he said happily. What was this wormhole to the eternal? Broaden your minds, people! A new line of handbags.”

The Guardian is launching a new column called The New Blueprint, focusing on design shapes politics, business, and the environment.

Salon interviewed Adam Curtis, the great documentarian, on Trump, Syria, and modern liberalism. I still think about his latest film Hypernormalisation (which I linked to here) often.