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On this day:
At 12th January of 1992, IBM introduces the ThinkPad 700C laptop. It was lightweight compared to its predecessors. With its distinctive black casework, and the introduction of the pointing nipple, the Thinkpad proved to be a very popular and reliable laptop.

1992 is quite a while back. The world of technology looked very different; the PC revolution was in full swing and hardly any of the brands that existed then still exist today, they have been swallowed up by the constant technological revolutions and market upheavals.

Some of the companies that did manage to keep going and quite successfully, in fact, are the large industrial institutions such as Microsoft or Apple; Windows still exists, too, although it looked completely different then. But there are not that many computer brands that have managed to survive: one example would be the brand "TravelMate", which now belongs to Acer and was first developed by Texas Instruments.

But TravelMate never reached the prominent position that another brand, that also existed in 1992, did: the ThinkPad. The ThinkPad brand has overcome crises and changes of direction in the PC market and has nonetheless managed to stay true to itself (for the most part).

Around the end of the 80's and beginning of the 90's, a new category of PC entered the market: portable computers. IBM had difficulty finding a place in this newly-developed market and was being overtaken by its competition. The company was considered a clumsy giant that was not able to act fast enough. The largest competitor of the time was Compaq, a company that was later taken over by Hewlett-Packard in 2002.

IBM's first ThinkPad laptop was designed in 1992 to be super easy to use. Industrial designer Richard Sapper made the ThinkPad to look like a Bento box food container, with little styling or flair. This computer combined all technical developments of the early 90's.

One of the most important technical aspects of the 700C was the display: at this point, small, monochrome 9.5-inch displays were still the general standard, but the ThinkPad 700C was equipped with a 10.4-inch color display and had a very compact form, for those days at least. From today's perspective, it might seem strange that the display was the most important feature of the first ThinkPad notebook, but then it was IBM's guarantee for success.

Design, brand name, technology, everything fit for the ThinkPad 700C. IBM had simply managed to produce the right product at the right time. The ThinkPad 700C did not invent the notebook, but it set a new standard for them. After the success of the 700C, IBM began to develop follow-up models.

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On this day: At 12th January of 1992, IBM introduces the ThinkPad 700C laptop. It was lightweight compared to its predecessors. With its distinctive black casework, and the introduction of the pointing nipple, the Thinkpad proved to be a very popular and reliable laptop. 1992 is quite a while back. The world of technology looked very different; the PC revolution was in full swing and hardly any of the brands that existed then still exist today,
IBM 700C_1992.png
Peter Morrisey
The PC market recently grew for the first time in six years
There's some good news on the PC market front.
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infotechs: HP Inc leads PC market amid falling global shipments: Gartner
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Numan Rasheed
With a market share of 22.5 percent, HP retained the top spot in the global PC market in the fourth quarter of 2017 even as shipments continued to decline, market research firm Gartner said on Friday. With shipments growing 6.6 percent, HP witnessed…
HP Leads Amid Falling Global PC Shipments in Q4 2017: Gartner - TachJokers
Kerry Amburgy-Dickson (Kalex)
The PC market recently grew for the first time in six years
There's some good news on the PC market front.
PC Lady
Make no mistake about it. It’s a war out there. The tech giants for desktop and mobile platforms are ready to fight for their piece of the market. In what seems like a move to try and beat Apple and Android, both Microsoft and RIM are offering cash…
PC Lady
celsiustempest
Esports and PC hardware’s growth is like peanut butter and jelly

PC gamers are nothing if not passionate. They’re often labeled as “enthusiasts” and even “hardcore,” but whatever label seems most fitting, PC gamers comprise a group of more than 1.2 billion individuals around the globe. This number is only growing, and its upward swing is directly connected to the surging esports industry. Market research firm Newzoo estimates the esports economy to reach nearly $700 million this year, representing a year-on-year growth of 43 percent. By 2020, Newzoo expects that to more than double, reaching $1.5 billion.

What once seemed like a stagnant market for PC gaming is now on the rise, thanks in large part to esports. PC hardware manufacturers are reaping the benefits, and have the potential to profit more.

The growing relationship between PCs and esports

PC gamers have traditionally eschewed the one-size-fits-all console approach, and the rise of esports and competitive video game tournaments has made the need for hardware customization even greater. This is apparent in the increasing popularity and acceptance of competitive gaming and has attracted even more hardcore PC users, with many wanting to build their own systems.

In response, PC manufacturers are driven to continue to offer the latest high-performance processors and graphics cards for customization for those players who want to be at the top of their game (or just want the latest-and-greatest gear). As the number of players in esports continues to rise, hardware manufacturers must continue to expand their offerings, especially through new avenues such as VR. It’s a great thing for both hardware manufacturers and the gamers themselves to push each other to even greater heights.

But this is only one side of the coin for how these two groups are becoming more tightly knit.

Development with the gamer in mind

Like the PCs developed and marketed for travelers with privacy screens and durable construction, esports requires a specific approach to ensure gamers have a glitch-free experience during critical sports competitions. In esports, computing power is king — a slow processor can be the difference between winning and losing. Manufacturers who already have experience creating powerful PCs for the enterprise have an advantage, but that does not mean vendors can rest easy.

As we inch closer to quantum computing, the rise of esports will be a critical blueprint for how to design, produce, market, and continue to innovate the next generation of powerful PCs. This also means making components more flexible for memory upgrades, for example, without having to replace the entire machine. For many teams designing with the enterprise or consumer in mind, a new approach must be taken to meet the new demands of esports competitors, and to drive forward the next era of computing that will be required for the future.

Investing in success

The rapid growth of esports is also attracting corporate investment through sponsorships and partnerships covering athletes, leagues, and major events. Such investment is helping to champion and spur further growth in the market. Among those leading the charge are PC hardware manufacturers who have the opportunity to showcase innovations to the gaming community in a live setting.

According to Newzoo, this sponsorship spending will soar to $655 million by 2020. For esports players, this brings new opportunities, driving ability to further refine their craft—with some players even becoming full-time professionals.

For marketers, this is an opportunity to reach new, highly-engaged audiences. And for PC manufacturers, there is an enormous opportunity to become even more deeply entrenched in the industry, better understanding the customer to deliver the best products possible. Without invaluable feedback from the players themselves, manufactures are losing critical intelligence to push the boundaries of their products.

Following the current blueprint for success

Taking the NFL as an example, it’s easy to see the vision for opportunity in the coming years. According to IEG research, sponsorship spending on the NFL and its 32 teams rose 4.3 percent to $1.25 billion in the 2016-2017 season — a staggering figure illustrating the possibilities for growth in esports.

But there are challenges ahead. For example, non-endemic brands also are getting involved in sponsorship, but to be successful, they must understand the environment and the audience. Gamers, of whom millennials make up a significant share, look for authenticity. In order to become part of esports and build trust with players and fans, these elements are essential.

With the PC industry and esports teaming up, the new opportunities are opening up for players, brands, and sports fans are endless — but it’s up to both parties to make the relationship a successful one.

https://venturebeat.com/2018/01/12/esports-and-pc-hardwares-growth-is-like-peanut-butter-and-jelly/
Esports and PC hardware’s growth is like peanut butter and jelly
PC gamers are nothing if not passionate. They're often labeled as "enthusiasts" and even "hardcore," but whatever label seems most fitting, PC gamers comprise a group of more than 1.2 billion individuals around the globe. This number is only growing, and its upward swing is directly connected to the surging esports industry. Market research firm Newzoo estimates the esports economy to reach nearly $700 million this year, representing a year-on-ye...
MSWindows&AzusaNakano&ObitoUchihaFan1997
On this day:
At 9th December of 1987, Microsoft releases version 2.0 of Windows. The most notable feature of Windows 2.0 was that application windows could overlap each other, unlike in Windows 1.0. The terminology of “Minimize” and “Maximize” was also introduced in Windows 2.0. Windows 2.0 was a relatively obscure operating system, as the popularity of Windows did not really take off until version 3 in the 1990’s. Interestingly, Microsoft officially supported Windows 2.0 until December 31, 2001, a span of 14 years.

Windows 10 may be the version of its OS that Microsoft really wants you to use, but 30 years ago the tech giant launched Windows 2.0. Windows 2.0 was the 2nd version of Microsoft’s GUI-based operating system, released in 1987. Windows 2.0 was faster and more stable than Windows 1.0. This Windows version also had more in common still with both the LISA and future versions of Windows.

Apple was struck by similarities between Windows 2 and LISA, as they had been with Windows 1.0 and again pressed with legal action. The similarities in Windows 2.0 may have arisen because an agreement struck by Apple and Microsoft about disputed technologies in Windows 1.0 omitted the mention of their use in future versions.

Microsoft argued that both they and Apple had derived the disputed technologies from a mutual inspiration in Xerox’s GUI-based Alto OS. The judges agreed with Microsoft, and with their ruling Apple lost decisively in regard to use of the disputed technologies for not only Windows 2.0 but also any future versions.

The system introduced the control panel and ran the first versions of Excel and Word. Extended memory was supported and updated for the release of Intel’s 80386 processor. It was during this time that Microsoft became the largest software vendor in the world, just as computers themselves were becoming more commonplace.

The fact that Windows systems were user-friendly and relatively affordable was undoubtedly a contributing factor to the growing PC market. Six months after the launch of Windows 2.0 Microsoft released Windows 2.1x (also known as Windows/386) on May 27, 1988. This included Intel’s new 386 processor, which supported improved memory.

Microsoft went on to sell one million copies of Windows 2.0 and Windows 2.1x in 1988 - compare that to sales of Windows 7, which topped 630 million licences (including business) in July 2012. In 1988, a year after the launch of Windows 2.0, Microsoft became the world’s largest software company based on sales.

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#MicrosoftWindows #Microsoft
#Onthisday #PC #OperatingSystem #Retro
#Oldschool #Technology #80sTechnology
#Windows2_0_30ThAnniversary
On this day: At 9th December of 1987, Microsoft releases version 2.0 of Windows. The most notable feature of Windows 2.0 was that application windows could overlap each other, unlike in Windows 1.0. The terminology of “Minimize” and “Maximize” was also introduced in Windows 2.0. Windows 2.0 was a relatively obscure operating system, as the popularity of Windows did not really take off until version 3 in the 1990’s. Interestingly, Microsoft
windows_87.png
Numan Rasheed
This site may earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use. The PC market has been sliding for the better part of a decade now. Quarter after quarter, people buy fewer traditional PCs and more mobile devices. Now, despite…
PC Market Grows for the First Time Since 2011 - TachJokers
SOGO Tech News
The new report from analyst firm IDC shows a 0.7 percent increase in PC shipments over the last quarter of 2017.
The post PC Market Grows for the First Time Since 2011 appeared first on ExtremeTech....
PC Market Grows for the First Time Since 2011
The new report from analyst firm IDC shows a 0.7 percent increase in PC shipments over the last quarter of ... Read More